ADS Adds Supply and Service to Northern California

Sept. 25, 2014

HILLIARD, Ohio — (September 22, 2014) — Advanced Drainage Systems, Inc. (ADS), a leading global manufacturer of water management products and solutions for commercial, residential, infrastructure and agricultural applications, has opened a stocking/distribution yard in Alviso, California.  The Silicon Valley facility is the third ADS location in Northern California, joining a supply yard in Benicia and a manufacturing plant in Madera, increasing the local supply of the company’s products used in storm water and sanitary sewer management projects. 

“The Northern California market has seen continual infrastructure development to meet the needs of the region’s growing technology sector,” said Bob Klein, Executive Vice President, Customer Relations at ADS. “This new facility is a continuation of our longstanding commitment to having a presence in markets that support our customer’s water management needs.”

ADS products are used for a wide range of water management systems that support athletic facilities, commercial and residential real estate complexes, airports, highways and more. The company’s more than 3,800 employees support a network of 58 manufacturing locations and 29 stocking service yards in strategic locations across the globe.

About ADS

Advanced Drainage Systems, Inc., is the world’s largest producer of corrugated HDPE pipe. Founded in 1966, it serves the storm and waste water industry through a global network of 58 domestic and international manufacturing plants and 29 distribution centers. In addition to its flagship N-12 pipe, and HP Sanitary and Storm pipe, the company offers a complete line of fittings and other accessories including StormTech storm water chambers, Nyloplast drainage structures, INSERTA TEE, storm water treatment units and various geotextiles. To learn more about ADS, visit www.ads-pipe.com.

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