On the Loose

June 15, 2015
Sw Jk

As Texas braces for more storms and possible flooding this week, floods in another part of the world on Sunday sparked a minor storm on the Internet.

In Tbilisi, Georgia, severe flood damage allowed animals to escape from the local zoo. Photos and video looking like special effects footage from a futuristic movie—anyone remember Twelve Monkeys?—showed large animals roaming the city’s streets. Approximately 300 animals—half the zoo’s population—were missing as of Sunday. Many of the missing animals were small and relatively harmless—birds and fish—but they also reportedly included a crocodile, bears, wolves, large cats, and at least one hippo, pictured in this New York Times article.

As Texas braces for more storms and possible flooding this week, floods in another part of the world on Sunday sparked a minor storm on the Internet. In Tbilisi, Georgia, severe flood damage allowed animals to escape from the local zoo. Photos and video looking like special effects footage from a futuristic movie—anyone remember Twelve Monkeys?—showed large animals roaming the city’s streets. Approximately 300 animals—half the zoo's population—were missing as of Sunday. Many of the missing animals were small and relatively harmless—birds and fish—but they also reportedly included a crocodile, bears, wolves, large cats, and at least one hippo, pictured in this New York Times article. [text_ad] Officials were responding to reports of animal sightings and working to catch the animals, using tranquilizer darts in some cases. Some animals, unfortunately, were killed to prevent harm to the city's human population. The country's prime minister called for Tbilisi residents to stay indoors and off the streets until the animals are recaptured. Heavy rains had caused the Vere River that runs through the heart of the city to overflow its banks, washing away cars, buildings, and portions of roads. Twelve people, including two zoo employees, were killed as a result of the flooding. On a somewhat similar but less dramatic note, we have a story on zoos coming up in Stormwater magazine. As with other large facilities—university campuses, military bases, industrial parks—zoos have stormwater requirement to meet, and many are incorporating novel green infrastructure and water harvesting installations, sometimes as part of the animal habitats and exhibits.

Officials were responding to reports of animal sightings and working to catch the animals, using tranquilizer darts in some cases. Some animals, unfortunately, were killed to prevent harm to the city’s human population. The country’s prime minister called for Tbilisi residents to stay indoors and off the streets until the animals are recaptured.

Heavy rains had caused the Vere River that runs through the heart of the city to overflow its banks, washing away cars, buildings, and portions of roads. Twelve people, including two zoo employees, were killed as a result of the flooding.

On a somewhat similar but less dramatic note, we have a story on zoos coming up in Stormwater magazine. As with other large facilities—university campuses, military bases, industrial parks—zoos have stormwater requirement to meet, and many are incorporating novel green infrastructure and water harvesting installations, sometimes as part of the animal habitats and exhibits.

About the Author

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen is the former editor of Erosion Control and Stormwater magazines. 

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